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Reviews Of All The Quests. All Of Them.

Discussion in 'Wynncraft' started by Melkor, Dec 30, 2020.

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  1. Melkor

    Melkor The dark enemy of the world HERO

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    Okay. A bit of backstory before I jump into this. A few months ago, I was about halfway through my shaman playthrough when I decided to start making reviews of the quest I was doing. I'd seen some people do it on the forums, and thought it'd be kind of fun to write out my opinions on a bunch of quests. Then, life happened as it so often does, and I was unable to really play much or write reviews of quests. So they kind of sat there, half finished. After some of that stuff was resolved and the semester was about over, I decided to finish them up. However, with the Gavel re-release right around the corner, I ended up not finishing my playthrough, or doing the first half of a new playthrough in order to to all the quests for this. I started a new character a while back and did some of the early quest on it, and then did any quests I could on other characters that had skipped them, but there are still a large number I haven't done recently. Any review written in red (I tried to make it as dark and light theme friendly as possible, let me know if it isn't) is for a quest that I didn't do on my shaman, the low level or another class after I started writing the reviews and as such is based on previous playthroughs.

    That said, here are the reviews. Obviously, spoiler warning for any and all quests and any lore associated with them. Enjoy.

    One small disclaimer: all of these reviews are meant to be mostly accurate, but are written to be humorous. As such, all of the overall opinions are real, a lot of the comments I make are purely for entertainment purposes and are in no way representative of my real opinions of the people who worked hard to make these quests. All of my criticisms are heavily amplified and are not meant in any way as an attack on the people who work on the server and who make the quests, purely as a jab at the quest itself.

    1.) King’s Recruit: Better than it was, a lot better. However, it still could really do with a description of soul points and maybe a bit on how spells factor into combat. Overall it is no longer misleading, but could still do a bit more for new players.


    1.) Enzan’s Brother: You walk down a road and talk to a guy. I mean, it isn’t exactly thrilling. You walk. Down a road. Quest over. Sorry @Torpid , don’t really see the greatness of it.


    2.) Poisoning the Pest: Honestly a pretty entertaining quest. You go, you grab some poison, you put it in the farm’s water supp- wait, that makes you sound like a bad person- anyway, you poison the water, turn on the sprinklers wait for the guy’s father to di- wait, let me try again- you wait for the zombie dude to die, write a novel during the cutscene and then it’s over. Actually pretty fun, and shows off some of the cool armor stand magic the content team can do.


    4.) Cook Assistant: THIS QUEST. I introduced a friend to Wynncraft the other day, and we did this quest. I realized about then that it offers zero guidance. How would a new player know to go to Katoa for the items? How would a new player know that the wheat whatevers had to be the same tier. I didn’t, and I’ve played for more than a few hours. Took me a while to figure that one out. It’s just a fetch quest, which isn’t all that great to begin with, but the fact that it offers zero guidance to new players (who likely won’t easily figure it out) makes this one pretty terrible in my eyes.


    5.) The Sewers of Ragni: Pretty decent. It has an okay story and introduces you to the dungeon pretty well. It also isn’t too grindy and isn’t just another fetch quest. Probably the best quest in this level range. I’m not a huge fan of most of the dungeon quests, but I rather like this one.


    5.) Tunnel Trouble: I guess pretty okay? The “defend” sections are pretty dull, but the rest of it is okay. I like it overall, but it’s nothing amazing. It does give clear directions for the most part, which is something early quests need and many lack, which is in its favor. Overall one of the better early game quests, but nothing too amazing.


    6.) Infested Plants: Wow, so much better than the original. Instead of going down a hole, getting sugarcane and then coming back, you go up a tree, go down a hole, and then come back. Such a thrill.


    8.) Underwater: Talk to a guy, go talk to another guy, then go get some stuff, come back to guy #2, get a QUEST HELMET (the first time I’ll bring this complaint up, but by no means the last), go through a really boring underwater obstacle course. Go back to guy #1. Wow. Amazing. A fetch quest with double the fetching.


    10.) Elemental Exercise: Kinda neutral on this one really. It does a poor job of explaining elements, but it does at least do something. It also is just a kinda meh quest. “Go kill stuff, then escape a burning cave” which isn't wonderful, but it’s also not bad, especially for this low a level.


    12.) Mushroom Man: A fetch quest, but I have a soft spot for it for some reason... Not too much to say about it other than that.


    14.) Arachnids’ Ascent: You get a bucket, you run up an exploding track and then get lava. There’s also buggy parkour over lava so that you can get royally screwed up if you make a mistake and aren’t a mage. Not all that great.


    14.) Creeper Infiltration: Honestly, this one is pretty okay considering it’s in this level range, even though it’s just an elaborate fetch quest with a side of “run around and come back”. Definitely not one of the best, but at least for the level it’s pretty okay.


    14.) Deju Vu: This one is pretty creative. Though it can be kind of buggy and it definitely is a rather long one, this one has some interesting mechanics and lore, and it stands out as one of the more modern feeling quests in the early game, not just another fetch quest.


    15.) Potion Making: This quest is so amazing. First you get a bunch of items that don’t drop nearly as often as they should, then you go kill a useless miniboss. Great prep for Gavel.


    18.) Maltic’s Well: This is just another quick “go kill a boss” quest. There’s really not much that can be said about it.


    20.) Grave Digger:This quest tries to be clever and interesting, but because they lacked the mechanical ability to do a lot of things when this was made, it ultimately feels like an ordinary fetch quest. First you run from Detlas to Nemract, which is a great way of introducing the player to Nemract if they haven’t been there yet, but then you just buy a guy a drink, get some rotten flesh and rob a grave. I feel like I should keep a tally of all the crimes we commit over the course of this list, because I think this is the quest that really inspires us to go on our worldwide crime spree.


    21.) Macabre Masquerade: You go down a pit, go through some very disappointing puzzles, kill a thing, and leave. It’s honestly an extremely tame and boring quest, without much action going on.


    21.) Studying the Corrupt: Well, since this one broke after I finished it on my mage, I feel like I should take a star off, but I’ll remain objective here. I am a professional after all. Oh, wait, I’m not? Okay, well this quest sucks because it broke after I finished it. Aside from that how is it? Well, it’s actually pretty okay. I like some of the puzzles and challenges you have to do, although it does feel more scripted and cinematic than like you are actually doing the cool stuff yourself. Overall, it’s not a bad quest but it does lack an action element to keep me interested.


    23.) Cluck Cluck: You talk with a guy, you murder a chicken, you learn it was a misunderstanding. Old quest, not much to do, end of story.


    23.) Pit of the Dead: This is like some of the older, more boring quests I’ve already covered, but worse. You go down a hole, jump in a pool and then exit the hole. How is this worse, you may ask? Most of these at least have a puzzle or miniboss, but this one even lacks that much character. It’s maybe the biggest waste of a quest in the entire game, but at least it’s over quickly.


    24.) Dwelling Walls: This quest is incredibly frustrating. However, it’s actually pretty cool, and I really like the mechanics of the puzzle. Overall, a pretty solid -if quick- quest for this level range.


    24.) The Dark Descent: Well, I can’t really complain about this too much. It’s creative, it’s interesting, and it has a lot going on. However, this quest feels extremely long for this point in the game, and honestly this is another quest that suffers from there being too many cinematics and not enough actual gameplay.


    25.) Recover the Past: I don’t like this quest. There, I said it. It’s really long, but it feels like a lot of little side missions together. The story of the quest as a whole is pretty interesting, but there’s way too many fetch-quest-y, busywork parts for me to really like.


    26.) Lost Tower: This quest I barely remember; it’s yet another “go here, kill a miniboss, get a thing, and deliver to so-and-so”, which frankly got old after the first one.


    26.) Corrupted Village: This has a lot of fetch-quest-y components. However, they’re actually more interesting than the average fetch quest, and it’s short enough that while these can be a bit annoying, I’ll forgive them and say that the quest is actually okay. It’s not going to win any awards or anything, but it’s a solid quest at this level.


    28.) The Mercenary: I love the idea of an assassination mission, where staying unseen and sneaking through an enemy base until you quickly kill the one target you were sent to eliminate is crucial, and being noticed is a fatal mistake. How does this measure up to that? It sort of does? You do have to stay mostly unseen, but it’s not a terrible thing if you are and end up having to kill someone, or a lot of someones even. Also, because Wynncraft stealth mechanics just flat out don’t exist in this case, there’s not a lot that you can really do to aid in this. Not a terrible quest, but it could use some serious reworks before I’ll say it’s good.


    28.) Misadventure on the Sea: The first quest that really stands out as exceptional, the story is fun, there’s variety in what you do, there’s good dialogue, nice characters and an overall very unique experience. This quest is definitely a lot level gem, even without all the fun secrets and hidden parts.


    30.) Craftmas Chaos: Oh my god. I’ve done this quest so many times, I actually cannot give a full review of it without having a breakdown of some sort. I don’t know why this one specifically, but for some reason, this quest has become a joke with some of my friends, because we all remember having done this one so many times. I guess it’s memorable? It’s not a bad quest, although it does take a lot of traveling and it’s really rather long. It’s pretty entertaining really. How doesn’t love murdering Santa, after all?


    31.) Green Gloop: I barely remember this one. You go in a pit. You kill things. You turn it in. Quest over.


    32.) A Sandy Scandal: This one is pretty entertaining, although the amount of running around and waiting for unskippable dialogue is definitely a bit irritating, especially on repeat playthroughs.


    33.) Meaningful Holiday: This quest is as wholesome as it is long. However, with that length comes an amount of boredom. It’s another quest where stuff happens around you, but really it doesn’t seem to matter at all that you’re there. You don’t do anything. You’re just along for the ride, and boy what a long, unskippable dialogue and cinematics-filled ride it is.


    33.) Kingdom of Sand: This quest is actually really interesting. I remember finding it annoying the first time I did it, but I’ve grown a liking for it. The heist section is really interesting and entertaining, and one of the better stealth missions in the game. I’d go so far as to say that I’d like to see more quests following its lead, so I think it’s fair to say that this is actually a pretty good quest.


    34.) Stable Story: This quest is yet another (do you sense my frustration?) “go in a pit and kill a miniboss” quest. But, this one’s unique! It’s got two minibosses! Two! Count ‘em! Well, I don’t care. I don't even care if they add a red and blue miniboss! It’s the same thing as so many other quests, I honestly don’t care enough to keep track of them all at this point. From this point onward, every low level quest where you go down a hole and kill a weak miniboss doesn’t even deserve an entry. I’ll just make a bad pun and then we’ll all pretend that that quest just didn’t happen. At least you get a horse? Yes, but we don’t hand out sympathy prizes here.


    35.) WynnExcavation Site A: Okay, before I go and “you just go down a pit and grab a thing and leave”, like I would for any other quest. This quest series. Do I think it’s the best and most interesting series in the game still? Yes. Do I think that even after all these years, Site D is the single best quest in the game? Absolutely. Would it be half the quest or series that it is without these kind of lame prequels? No, it wouldn’t. Do I still wish that this was a better quest. Yeah, I’ve gotta admit that I do. As much as I love this series, I have to admit that some of these earlier ones just aren’t all that great. But we’ll forgive it, just for how good the series gets. Still wouldn’t say no to a slight rework on this one though...


    35.) Tribal Aggression: Aaaannnd while I said that any quest where you just go down a hole and fight a miniboss gets a pun, but what if -drumroll please- what if… it was two holes and two minibosses? Well, hole-y hell, this quest is boring.


    36.) Wrath of the Mummy: I guess some of the puzzles are okay, and the pink wool is a callback to a different time, but- wait, what’s that? Miniboss in a pit? Well then. Overall, I was so scared I had to call my mummy.


    38.) Canyon Condor: This one’s a bit different. In order to get an egg for a researcher, first you get some gold for some lazy miner, when you get a flower for a hermit, then you… wait, this a bunch of little fetch quests, isn’t it? Well then. At least the miniboss you fight is on top of a cliff, instead of in a hole, so I don’t get to make a pun here. What a pit-y.


    39.) Pirate’s Trove: You find a bunch of markers in a big city based on weirdly worded riddles. If the riddles were a bit more clever, I think this would be more fun, but I don’t really think there’s a ton you can do to make this any more entertaining than it is. I get that this was meant to introduce you to Gavel, but it lacks all the important things. Annoyingly grindy fetch quests, weird buggy mechanics and of course it missed out on the biggest thing: the infamous… Compulsory Gavel Miniboss (TM).


    40.) Ice Nations: Oh, what a fun quest. First you go here, then you go there, then you go back here and then over there and back here and did I mention all this travel is in the ocean, so if you didn’t bring a boat you’ll want to die? It’s great. Oh, and it rewards you with a quest helmet, which is like running errands for some annoying, whiny people and then they pay you back with a burning bag of dog poo. Thanks.


    41.) Heart of Llevigar: My opinion of this quest has undergone a complete 180 since it was first released. When Gavel came out, this was some of the first content I experienced, and for some reason, this quest in particular rubbed me the wrong way. I hated it. Maybe it’s because everything was super buggy at the time, but for whatever reason, I didn’t like it at all. Since then, I’ve done it a few more times, and honestly I have no idea what I was thinking. This quest has it all. Puzzles, fun levels, funny dialogue, an interesting story. It honestly holds up really well, even now, and is in my opinion, one of the better quests in the game and one of the best quests from Gavel’s release.


    42.) Star Thief: Another quest my opinions have fully flipped on, but this time, because it was reworked (I stand by my belief that the original was terrible). The start is kind of buggy, but that’s my only complaint. This quest has a lot of fun mechanics and is far more than just a quick runup to a miniboss like it once was. Being a Gavel quest, it does end in a Compulsory Gavel Miniboss (TM) fight (shocking, I know), but I’ll forgive that in this one case. Above all else, it’s just fun to do. Honestly, that’s the most important metric to me, so I’ll just leave it at that.


    42.) Clearing the Camps: This may be my least favorite quest. You just run to three unmarked camps, kill three enemies and leave. That’s the entire quest. It sucks, I’m moving on.


    43.) Underice: So this one’s pretty entertai- mandatory quest helmet alert! Oh right, you go and turn in one quest helmet, which is amazi- oh wait, you need to get a new one, but you get to pay for this one! How nice. Then you do a fetch quest and have a “moral” dilemma: is it more profitable to give it to the squid guy or the elderly fisherman? Whichever you choose, it wasn’t really worth it, but it’s over and you’re off to do more interesting, better things.


    43.) Fate of the Fallen: Well, it’s a bit better. While it’s almost entirely either traveling, killing a swarm of enemies, and watching cutscenes, it’s at least a little better than Underice, but not a lot. Frankly, this quest feels more like a deliberate speed bump than a quest designed to be interesting.


    44.) Green Skinned Trouble: Okay, scratch what I said about Clearing the Camps, this is the worst quest. How could it possibly be worse you ask? Well, it’s the same thing, but this time, instead of killing one enemy at each camp you have to grind for five axe shards, and then, since this is a Gavel quest you get to (say it with me) fight a bad miniboss. Not immediately though, first you have to get past what I am convinced is the glitchiest puzzle in the game (it broke for me twice this time alone) and then you have to pick the right parkour to get to the boss which is positively thrilling and not just a total time-waster. Then you get to the Compulsory Gavel Miniboss (TM), which is as boring as usual, and then the quest is over. The only thing missing from this mess of mistakes is a quest helmet.


    45.) Bob’s Lost Soul: While this is the mother of all grind quests, where you have to grind not one, not two, not even three, but four reasonably annoying to get items, let’s address some of the other, even more glaringly annoying parts before you mention that… well, it’s too late, but before we mention it again? So, you have to travel around in Nesaak, then halfway across the province, then back to get those grind items, then all over getting *more* random items (And it doesn’t even get a free pass on the rose because the lonely spider isn’t in this quest anymore. Wynn devs, please fix this.). Actually, you should make several trips back and forth around the province I’m not even going to discuss here, and then you go back to Bremminglar, and then you go back to Nesaak and then you get to open Bob’s tomb with the help of some strangers (the original write-up had five minutes of screaming in rage here, but I decided to save that for the write-up of ???) and then you go back to the guy who started it. And then, finally, blissfully, miraculously, it’s over. Seriously. Seriously.


    46.) WynnExcavation Site B: This one’s a bit better than the first one; it has some good puzzles, some interesting dialogue, and overall it expands the story for the future quests, but it is not, in itself, super interesting. However, I’m still okay with it, even if there is a lot of just running. I’ll still give it a pass, purely because WynnExc.


    48.) Frost Bite: I’m happy to see this quest now. It used to be a pretty bad, forgettable fetch quest with a bit of travelling. Now, however, it’s a fun quest with interesting puzzles, environments and dialogue. It gives some lore about the history of Nesaak and is a really nice counterpart to Fate of the Fallen. Is it okay to say a quest is good because it gives us another perspective on events seen in another, unrelated quest? It is? Good, because I was going to anyway. This one now easily is one of the best in this level range.


    49.) The House of Twain: This quest is unique and fun, and I do like the fact that you can skip part of it if you’ve done it before, however I did notice in my latest playthrough that trying to make it through the trapdoor to the cellar was nearly impossible even with high walkspeed, so either I’m totally inept or the timing needs work, because there’s no way a player who didn’t know what they were doing would be able to make that, and it’s essential for finishing the quest without looking it up or knowing what to do ahead of time.


    49.) Rise of the Quartron: While I appreciate that they tried to do something different and unique here, this quest falls flatter than a cake leavened using all my skills as a baker. It boils down to a lot of running around and talking to people, and then being bullied by a random rat while you talk to the guy who gives you the quest. Parts of it feel like they were thrown in just to make it longer. Scratch that, the whole quest does. They did try to do something fun and unique with the boss fight - oh, right, it ends in a Compulsory Gavel Miniboss (TM) - but the boss isn’t that fun to fight and falls just as flat as the rest of the quest.


    49.) An Iron Heart Part I: I’m happy to see that this is one of the quests being reworked in 1.20, but, since this is based on quests as they are now, I’m going to review it based on how bad it is now. And boy is it bad. You talk with a guy, follow a trail, go down a pit and fight… wait for it… a Compulsory Gavel Miniboss (TM)! Hooray!


    50.) A Grave Mistake: I don’t even know that I should be listing this as a quest, since it wasn’t really meant to be, but whatever. It’s really interesting, though not really a good quest, due to a lack of player involvement in most of it. However, I’ll forgive it because it’s mainly mant as lore fodder, and the puzzles are above average, which is more than I could really ask for.


    51.) The Maiden Tower: Yay. Shrek. So funny. I felt so joy at being able to go, get a QUEST HELMET, kill a witch Compulsory Gavel Miniboss (TM), and then return to Shrek. I love Shrek so much that this was totally worth doing all of this and trekking around the swamp wasn’t a miserable waste of time.


    52.) Corrupted Betrayal: This felt pretty good for a dungeon quest. There’s a lot more player involvement than usual, you aren’t just given cutscenes and dialogue. The parkour is a pain in the neck, but otherwise, I thought this was an unusually entertaining dungeon quest.


    52.) Jungle Fever: I know this isn’t a popular quest because it involves running around, fetching stuff, and then getting murdered by overleveled golems, but I have to admit, the humor of the story really does get to me. I’ll give it a pass on the fetch quest side, purely because I find the fact that we’re robbing banks, including one we had saved from being robbed in a previous quest, hilarious.


    52.) Crop Failure: This one is just another “run around and find a minoboss to fight” quest, which ends, to the surprise of no one, in yet another Compulsory Gavel Miniboss (TM). I can’t get excited over this. I really can’t. I’m sorry.


    53.) Master Piece: This one’s a bit annoying, but I’ll admit, it’s kind of funny, The dialogue and the way that the artist responds to your descriptions honestly seems almost like a deeper message on how we communicate and how often we don’t say things in a way that makes other people understand us in the way we meant to be understood, but they might take their own meaning from them. Is that what they were going for? I doubt it. Is it at least good enough that I’ll say this quest is decent? Yeah,I guess I’ll give it that.


    53.) Death Whistle: Another boring fetch quest that ends in a Compulsory Gavel Miniboss (TM), though she’s barely deserving of the title. Listen, just between you and me, I’m starting to think that Gavel was released in a sort of unfinished state. Ultimately, you get a guy a flower and then murder his paying customer because he sold her the wrong thing. Yeah, I dunno either.


    54.) The Worm Holes: Go in giant hole in ground. Find stuff. Go in other giant hole in ground. Find more stuff. Such questing.


    54.) The Shadow of the Beast: Except for the grindy portions, the idea of hunting bigfoot via its tracks and collecting evidence along the way is pretty funny. However, grinding random stuff in the swamp? Not so fun. Also, mini-minboss followed by a proper Compulsory Gavel Miniboss (TM) wins this one a special seat in Excessive-Miniboss Hell.


    55.) Zight Island: A downright thriller. “Go here, talk to a guy, then go there, talk to another guy, then go there and talk to a third guy, then come back here and I’ll give you a worthless reward.” Not even a good reward (remember when it gave epic healing potions? Those were the days.) But wait, this one has a bonus! You get to go to Maro Peaks! I know, right? And, that means you get to wear a… that’s right, a quest helmet. Yup. You get to go to the worst location in all of Wynncraft and remove 1/4+ of your build to talk to a crazy hermit. Thrilling.


    55.) WynnExcavation Site C: Here’s where things start spicing up. I like the eavesdropping portion, I like the mad dash out followed by security guards. I like meeting Amadel, though I wish he had a bigger role so he was more remembered for when you do Site D, but overall, this quest is actually pretty good. And it really helps set up the story for the final quest in the series.


    57.) The Passage: Talk to a guy, then talk to another guy, then fight a Compu- oh wait, this is Wynn. I like that there’s an introduction to boss altars, but really I’m not a fan of this quest. The boss is a lot harder than any challenge you’ve faced yet, so it could be seen as a test to see your ability to overcome all the challenges headed your way, but really it just feels like they needed to show off what a boss altar boss is and needed a quest around this level.


    58.) An Iron Heart Part II: This one’s pretty interesting, although I wish the moral decision was handled a little better. However, it does this the best of all the quests with a “moral” decision, so maybe that’s on the player as much as the designers. Seeing where and how iron golems are made really is a pretty big shocker, I only wish that there was more to this story later.


    59.) The Order of the Grook: This is a great quest, but it has some serious flaws that I think need to be addressed. I like the tone, and even some of the education that a new player might get from it is pretty good. In fact, it’s definitely one of my favorite quests. However ,the fact that you’re incentivized to only pick out one tome and whatever wand works best for you right now is kind of an oversight; I don’t mind the wand choice, in fact I like the idea of choosing a reward like that, but the tome thing is kind of an oversight. Also ,some of the puzzles are straight up unfair or unbeatable. The fire one doesn’t work sometimes, especially if it's lagging. You can die of fall damage on the air one if you mess up. The magical creature one requires a bunch of guessing or looking it up; you’re only given two definite placements and a few hints as to where others might be. This wouldn’t be an issue if you could just redo those, or even if you were just told which ones were wrong, but since you can’t be sure, you have to either a) get lucky, b) look it up or c) spend a long time trying over and over again. Some classes are just better than others; materials vs artifacts gives you a choice; spend a bunch of time grabbing stuff for a fetch quest and making a necklace or something, or lookat three samples and leave. These complaints aside, I really do like this quest and definitely think of it as a high point in this level range.



    60.) Beneath the Depths: This quest is kind of hard to come up with a really easy review for - oh, wait no, you run around like an idiot on the ocean for a long time, then get a guy some treasure and it’s over. It’s just a really long fetch quest, with the added “benefit” of being in the ocean so travel takes even longer or costs more money. The only highlight is the buggy puzzle - if it can even be called that- at the beginning of the whole thing when you go to the map.


    61.) Reclaiming the House: Oh boy. This is yet another “go into a fort, kill the leader, and come back.” mission. And here I was thinking that they had run out of those. Silly me. Luckily, the Compulsory Gavel Miniboss (TM) at the end makes up for the lack of creativity or interesting mechanics in this quest… oh, wait, no, I just checked my notes and it doesn’t.


    61.) Redbeard’s Booty: I’m not generally a fan of ocean quests, especially ones that make you run around a lot, but this one’s pretty good. The running around is annoying, but it’s not that bad, and the rest of the quest more than makes up for it. It’s lively, interesting, and feels different from other quests. It also features some good dialogue and some fun exploring, although it does feel that there isn’t anything too special in that. It isn’t offensive in any way except the traveling around in the ocean part, and it is creative and different, so overall I’d say it’s one of the better quests in this level range.


    62.) Lost in the Jungle: “Go find x and kill a miniboss”. Do I even have to write reviews for these? I could probably just copy and paste the last one and no one would be able to tell the difference, much less fault me for that. There are so many of these quests in this level range, it’s really easy to see where they realized they needed more quests and decided to pad the roster with about a thousand of these.


    62.) Taproot: It’s terribly how much potential this quest had; it was the beginning to the major storyline of Gavel, and was supposed to begin the explanation of how the province got the way that it is now, and go into the lore behind the decay, and the light and the dark… instead we get a fetch quest with the worst exploration segment of any quest in the game “wander around this giant area until you find the one spot you’re supposed to”.


    63.) Out of my Mind: I love this quest. It starts out in a clever way, you go to the lab, you talk with the guy, then you solve a really good puzzle and then… there’s a minboss?! Come on! Well, aside from that, I like this quest. The dialogue is good. The story is fun and well written. The puzzle is excellent.


    64.) A Fighting Species: I suppose because this time you just beat the guy up instead of bring his head back, this is supposed to be different from the dozen quests exactly like it we’ve done since getting to Gavel? Really? It’s just another lazy “go kill a miniboss” quest with the wonderful twist that you get to grind first; easily my two favorite quest options, rolled into one… Seriously, all they needed to do was add a quest helmet and - oh wait, the reason you were grinding is so that you can also wear a quest helmet for this one. This quest and all of its brethren suck… oh, I nearly forgot: at the end there’s a Compulsory Gavel Miniboss (TM)! Literally every “awful quest” signature rolled into one. Pretty impressive really.


    64.) The Headless Hunt: Oh boy. Where to start with this one? I actually like that you have to look around for a clue as to what’s wrong with him. But, the fact that it doesn’t direct you to the dungeon, but to the castle itself is a problem in my opinion, as the castle’s path all but hides the dungeon, so if you didn’t know it was there, you might have some trouble finding it, and the way the castle repels you with a line of dialogue makes it feel like you’re meant to do something near Referick’s house first. A bigger issue though is how much this quest just gives up and says “use the magical book!” whenever it needs you to do something, which feels both uninteresting and lazy. A smaller issue is how little sense the lore and dialogue make and how this is just a glorified fetch quest, but whatever. I’m not even sure if I should count the ending as a miniboss, so I’m not gon- oh who am I kidding? You go and explore and waste a ton of time and then fight a Compulsory Gavel Miniboss (TM), except it’s passive and the damage comes from other enemies.


    65.) Lost Royalty: While this is, at its heart just another fetch quest, I have to admit, it at least does feel a bit more interesting. You do actually have a bit of interesting dialogue, and there’s more of a feeling of purpose to your actions, but I wish that there was more to it than just talking and running errands.


    66.) Lost Soles: While the puzzles in this quest are old, they still feel really good. I still enjoy searching around the mansion sometimes when I can’t remember the code and don’t look it up. It’s quite tricky, but I think that overall this is one of the few fully puzzle based quests that does a really good job. It’s easy to forget that this is technically a fetch quest, and because of that, I’ll totally forgive it.


    67.) From the Mountains: This quest would be entirely forgettable except for one thing. Quueeeeessst heeellllmmmeeet. And better yet, it’s out in the middle of nowhere. So if you didn’t know to bring it, you get to go all the way back to civilization to get it so you can participate in a fetch quest. That ends in a, uh… oh right, that ends in a Compulsory Gavel Miniboss (TM).


    67.) Memory Paranoia: This quest is a masterpiece. It’s one of the few quests where you’re meant to watch as events happen that still manages to be interesting and fun. I love the flashes between past and present, and how you can watch the story unfold as little snippets. The dialogue is a bit cheesy and could do with a revamp, and some of it doesn’t make a ton of sense, but overall I really think this ties in well with the main lore of Gavel and is a good quest all around. And then, Compulsory Gavel Miniboss (TM). Why? Good quest, good story, bad ending.


    68.) Temple of the Legends: I remember when this was one of the biggest challenges in the game and beating meant a great deal of hard work. I also remember the old days of grinding though. And it’s much nicer now (A note for you younger folks; the quest used to require a stack of either two or three different items including blaze powder and leather. Leather was a huge pain to farm, so a stack of leather was worth as much as a liquid emerald - and back then, you could get an ice cream cone for just a nickel...). However, the walking simulator element of it, having to travel all over the province and the ocean in order to get the handful of items for it, in addition to all the other quests you have to do, the errands to purify the light dust, the way you have to wear a quest helmet to get into the creeper cave so you can get - wait, another quest helmet? That you have to wear in a boss fight? A real boss fight!? Yeah, honestly, this quest kind of sucks. The boss fight is good, but the rest of the quest is so grindy and tedious that it’s hardly worth it.


    69.) Grand Youth: This is really just a fetch quest. When you get this far in the game and there have been so, so, so many fetch quests before this point, I don’t know that there’s anything new I can add to this. It’s a fetch quest, it sucks, and whoever made it should feel bad for what they did. Seriously. For real. There are so many fetch quests by this point that I don’t have anything to add to this.


    69.) The Lazarus Pit: Okay, can we first address the fact that the tombstone doesn’t make any sense? Not that the dates seem weird or anything, but “died:-1068 to 75”. That’s a really long death if you ask me. Okay, that note aside, why is there a random sign on top of the- okay, you know what? I’m not gonna mention how little sense this all makes, I’m just gonna talk about the quest. First off, I’ll give it points for relating to the Grand Youth quest in Wynn. However, much like that quest, this is a pretty boring fetch quest. The puzzles are alright, but after that it’s just “bring me <number> things for <reason> and you may proceed” which has all the entertainment value of watching paint dry at half speed. You then get a second fetch quest part where you go talk to a guy who gives you youth juice, which is a liquid emerald, possibly as some sort of statement about how wealth can make you live longer or those who are wealthy are seemingly immortal or something like that, or maybe it’s just because they needed a shiny bottle. Whichever. Either way, two part fetch quest that adds nothing of value.



    70.) Haven Antiquity: I can’t say this quest has held up well. You run around talking to people and killing a few enemies. Then you go back into the past and kill a few more enemies and then you come back to the present and talk to more people. Not really that much to say about it, but I would like to ask one question? Why the lava?


    70.) WynnExcavation Site D: I’ve gotta admit, I may be a bit biased by nostalgia here, but man do I love this quest. It’s the conclusion of a great storyline that’s been going on for 4 quests now. The betrayal is great, although I wish that you’d seen a bit more of him in the past so that it’d make more of an impact, and less of a “who is this guy?”. The escaping the city portion is brilliant and I absolutely love it, the puzzles are great, the boss fight is good. I don’t like the fetchy bit with the map fragments, and I wish that they’d make that a little more sensible, but otherwise I really like this quest and wish that there were more storylines of this caliber in the game.


    70.) Shattered Minds: Okay, I know this is the most meme-y quest, but this also offers a ton of very interesting and unique puzzles to work through as well as a really cool area to explore with tons of secrets. It also has funny, lighthearted dialogue which is a nice change from some of the more serious quests around this level. This is honestly a great quest, and I even think of it as one of the highest points in the game.


    71.) Finding the Light: And then we get to Finding the Light. Which has the least intuitive start of any quest. You have to get a thing. What thing? It won’t tell you. Where do you get it? Not sayin’. Then, you get to go do a fetch quest, which is actually mildly entertaining, but still is a fetch quest. You then get a quest helmet (YAY!). Which is also a legendary so you get to waste even more money identifying it. You then get to go to the realm of light, which is notable for having literally no reason to be there until level 74 (and even then it’s arguable).


    72.) Forbidden Prison: Probably the single most forgettable quest in the game (maybe just for me, I totally forgot this existed before writing them all down for these reviews), this is actually pretty good. However, I found that the detection areas were kind of weird and inconsistent, trying the same path didn’t always work sometimes. Also, while not technically a quest helmet, you have to wear a helmet for half of the quest. It makes more sense than any other quest helmet, enough I’m almost willing to forgive it, but it’s a quest helmet and quest helmets are bad.


    72.) Eye of the Storm: This quest gets a lot of hate for its weird lore and poor boss at the end. Does it deserve this? Well, sorta. It starts off with basic “go down this random hole and rescue a guy”, which is a tad stale, then a “sneaking to Lexdale” segment, which is actually pretty okay except for having to randomly go up on the guy’s balcony to look. This probably wouldn’t be so bad if not for the fact that the hand you’re looking at isn’t actually within render distance, so you’re looking at nothing. Then you go down the massive tunnel in his basement, solve a puzzle (that’s actually pretty decent and is totally wasted on this quest) and appear next to the wizard’s house. Then you run and get his stolen scroll (Haha, oh those silly cultists, always randomly stealing stuff like scrolls and amulets, haha. When will they ever learn? Seriously though, why?) and then you go down a massive hole titled “The Pit of Despair” (I did not give them permission to use the title of my future autobiography. Change the name or I will sue.). You then get to go through a ludicrous number of teleport rooms, some dialogue and a bit of grinding before fighting the Compulsory Gavel Miniboss (TM) and returning to the wizard to get your reward. If you take off the start, finish and weird lore, it’s actually not bad.


    73.) Troubled Tribesmen: this quest feels really, really bland,. It’s not offensively bad and it’s not really that good. It just feels really average. It reminds me a lot of the lower level quests where you do a series of short tasks and then there’s a minoboss, but there’s really only one short task and then you go down a hole and fight a miniboss. The dialogue and the story are at least a little more interesting than lot of these and that really does help cememnet is an average quest in my mind, rather than a bad one, and it least it’s one I remember and didn’t have to look up just to see which one it was like so many of the filler quests in Gavel.


    73.) Hollow Sirene: Speak of the devil… I hate quests where you have to investigate something, then come back. I get that it makes sense, but it’s annoying and just makes the quest take longer in a boring way. So, you do that, the quest gives a wise tip that you shouldn’t continue without proper protection, so as to not get pregn- to not be deafened by the banshee. You then report back and are told to go to the nearby church. You then are told to go graverobbing by the priest (excuse me?) and get to play “follow the sparkle” which is really neat your first time, and then gets progressively more annoying. You get to the grave you’re supposed to rob, do a puzzle and YAY! QUEST HELMET! You then go back with proper protection, fight the Compulsory Gavel Miniboss (TM) and grab your reward. Please note that this protection is only effective against banshees. We here at Melkor Entertainment Industries do not recommend using it to prevent pregnancy or the transmission of disease. Please do not use quest helmet in place of a hard hat. Please do not use quest helmet as eye protection. Please do not submerge quest helmet in water. Quest helmet may present a choking hazard. Please keep quest helmet out of the reach of children. Please do not operate heavy machinery while under the influence of quest helmet.


    74.) Reincarnation: I’m sure I’ll get a few comments on this one. I actually like it, for one thing. It’s got a lot of the elements I’ve complained about before on this list even. But there’s something about it that always makes me forgive it. Maybe it’s nostalgia, maybe it’s that the genuinely good parts really do overshadow the bad, but for whatever reason, I like this quest and am always excited to do it. Now, there is a fetch quest element, and there is a cooperative section where you have to open Bob’s tomb (twice, if you didn’t plan ahead and bring all the items you need), neither of which are good. One is walking simulator, and the other positively frustrating if you can’t get help quickly, and even more so if you die during the boss fight, Ah, the boss fight. While the first half of the quest is at best a bit frustrating, the second half really makes up for it. I’d argue this is one of,,if not the single best, bossfight in the game. The walk up to it feels so significant and grand, and it definitely was a fitting end to the game before Gavel came out. The fight itself is great on a mechanical level, the boss fighting in a manner that’s similar to you and who is a fast and active boss who doesn’t rely on minions to kill you or just rush you and try to dps you down quickly, but fights vaguely like a player and feels like a real challenge you’ve overcome to take his place as the greatest hero of Wynn.


    74.) Murder Mystery: Well, I love the idea of a proper investigation/ murder mystery in Wynncraft, but I understand that it would be really hard to implement this in a way that work s within Minecraft. So it comes as no real shock that this quest is incredibly linear and doesn’t really give the player any sort of autonomy in solving the mystery. However, this is really disappointing, and it honestly would be more fun if we tagged along with an actual detective and were shown them solving it; then at least you’d have the entertainment of watching a clever detective doing his job, since this is a purely cinematic quest with minimal input from the player. Then us not having any role in really solving it would make more sense. As it is, it feels like we’re thrust through the quest without any real say in the matter, and as long as you obey the quest book, there’s no mystery at all.


    74.) Acquiring Credentials: So, basically, when I saw that I had to write this one up next, I looked it up on the wiki, said “oh right, it’s that one” and then decided to do something else. So, here I am, later, writing it up. Why? Because frankly, this one sucks, and it sucks to keep writing “it sucks because it’s just another fetch quest” and it sucks even more to write up how it’s just a fetch quest, but there’s a lot of components to it, so let’s just skip all that and go straight to “it sucks”. Can we? No? Dangit. Well, here goes. So, you run a bunch of errands for a bunch of people, most of which are illegal and even help continue some guy’s drug addiction, so I don’t know why you’re the hero anymore. Then you do some shady stuff to get a passport, including robbing a government office, which feels like it’s definitely a pretty bad thing. Then you get the passport, find out it doesn’t belong to the guy who you were trying to get it for anyway (and then promptly don’t help him get his passport, because you really are an awful person, aren’t you?) and then take it and pretend it’s yours, which is probably a felony or something, but whatever.


    74.) The Realm of Light: Following up a level 71 quest (this should have been level 72 so you didn’t have to come all the way back here), you immediately get thrust into a quest so you can...go kill a thing and then get teleported to the Heliolux village so you can go through some wonderful unskippable dialogue in which you’re told that this is a fetch quest and you shouldn’t have come he- wait no I added that last bit myself, it just tells you to go get stuff (the second half is merely implied). Then, realizing you’re probably excited to go out and do something it tells you to get even more stuff! YAY! And then, to top it all off, you get…drumroll please… yup, another quest helmet. And then you get to go on another fetch quest, to two different locations. After an absurdly long trip, you get to fight a -say it with me everyone- Compulsory Gavel Miniboss (TM). In case I didn’t mention it earlier, the trip here is ridiculously long and boring. Why do I mention it? Well, you get to go all the way back. Then, you get to turn around and go even further to turn in the quest. Why? I don’t know. Maybe to show off the massive, empty world, maybe to bore you into investing in a speed build. In case I haven’t made it clear, I utterly despise this quest and everything to do with it. Scratch what I said about Clearing the Camps and Green Skinned Trouble, this is the worst quest. I’m actually upset I replayed it for this review.


    75.) Flight in Distress: So you use the illegally obtained fake passport to board a flight (which is probably illegal) and then you just kind of chill until a bunch of stuff proves that the people running this operation are completely unfit to fly any sort of aircraft professionally, much less with passengers on board. You do several tasks around the airship, which to their credit don’t just feel like busywork, so points there I guess. You then get attacked by pirates, jump on over, fight a Compulsory Gavel Miniboss (TM), get knocked out and put in a cell, wake up, and break out. I’ll admit the key forging thing is actually pretty cool and well designed, and I rather like it. Then you fight another Compulsory Gavel Miniboss (TM), take some treasure and get back safely somehow. Overall, it’s actually a pretty decent quest and has some really good mechanics, and I honestly rather like it.


    75.) The Ultimate Weapon: I… I get it. It’s a satire of grindy fetch quests. But really? Honestly? Truly? You fetch a lot of stuff all over the forest. Like. What else is there to say?


    76.) Aldorei’s Secret Part I: Honestly, this was an attempt at making a free investigation quest, something like what I wish they had done with Murder Mystery. And frankly, it turned out not all that well. The scale of it was a tad ambitious, but if it was confined to a smaller, more navigable area, this would honestly have been a really neat quest, which makes me even more disappointed the murder myster quest didn’t have these kinds of mechanics. Is it too late for me to complain about that? No, I don’t think it is. They should have added mechanics like this to Murder Mystery. That being said, the ending really sucked.It’s obvious which reward you’re supposed to choose, and it really cheapens the choice of doing the right thing if you know that there will be a reward for it later, even if there isn’t now. In addition, the “Sol Embassy testing you” ending feels really lazy and honestly makes the quest so much less interesting than it could have been if there was a better story behind it than that.


    76.) The Bigger Picture: This quest is pretty unique and quite fun. It does have a Compulsory Gavel Miniboss (TM) partway through, but it isn’t the focal point of the quest and it does actually fit within the quest, so I’ll forgive it. The rest of the quest more than makes up for it. It’s a fun concept and a decently fun parkour map. Lighthearted and simple. I always remember it as a kind of boring quest for some reason, but it’s honestly a lot more fun when you’re doing it.


    77.) The Hunger of Gerts Part I: So, this quest… Okay, this questline is so dysfunctional and just utterly disconnected, it might as well not be a questline at all; it has absolutely nothing in common with the second half, which I’ll address more in my review of it, but I just wanted to mention here. Okay, first off, this story for this quest relies on everyone thinking that the Gerts are really, really dumb. But we clearly see that they’re not, and that they are far more clever than they’ve been given credit for. How is it that at no point has someone realized this? Like, they’re clearly capable of intelligent action, they must have done it in the past. I just don’t see why this “stupid” stereotype needed to be assigned to them, when it clearly isn’t correct. I get that incorrect stereotypes are frequently assigned to people we dislike, but you don’t just ignore your military enemy because there’s a popular stereotype that they’re dumb. And there has to be evidence otherwise. I’m gonna leave it at that for now and move on to the actual quest. Other than that, this quest really is just a lot of running, quest helmeting, and then holy cow does it take a dark turn with them eating a guy’s friend in prison. Where the hell did that come from? Okay, some therapy sessions later, you move along, get out of the prison - after a Compulsory Gavel Miniboss (TM) of course - return to the watch, and have them change absolutely nothing because that’s definitely what you do when your enemy far surpasses your expectations. I get that the villagers are supposed to be lazy and stupid, but overall none of this really makes much sense, and after a pretty lackluster quest, I’d at least expect an ending that sets up for the second quest or something.


    77.) Purple and Blue: This quest starts off with a sort of puzzle, a scavenger hunt really. That makes you think that this might be a good quest and that you’ll discover something interesting about the lore of the lake and some st- nope. Just a walking simulator. So you do some pretty boring puzzles, you talk with a guy, get a quest helmet, go down under the lake, and then fight a Compulsory Gavel Miniboss (TM). It really does feel like yet another filler quest. Can I make that my review? Can I just put “Filler quest” and leave it at that? No? Ah well.


    78.) The Hunger of Gerts Part II: Aaannd here’s where the real rant starts. First off, as I mentioned earlier, why are these two quests part of a questline? It doesn’t make sense. They are not related, they don’t make sense together. We ended the last quest with the Gerts being a bunch of eating monsters; they literally ate a guy in a prison cell, why the hell am I supposed to be on their side? What about them have I seen at this point to make me want to side with them? That’s the problem with the start of this quest; when we left off, they were monsters who eat people. Now we’re supposed to be on their side… because we learn they’re hungry? Also, it tries to play off the “they’re stupid” gag from last time, but this time they’re actually not very smart? Like, I don’t get what their intelligence level is supposed to be. They were smart last time, but now they’re not? Did they all collectively receive a blow to the frontal lobe? Like, I don’t get how smart I’m supposed to think of them as. Do they have different levels of intelligence on different days? Were they all blessed by Cultivation or something?. Like, seriously, what the hell am I supposed to make of this? Last time you got caught by their dogs right away, but now you don’t? I don’t get it. Are their dogs also on an intelligence timer? You’re using the same disguise - hey wait, did I mention you get to wear a quest helmet for the beginning of this? You get to wear a quest helmet for the beginning of this. Okay, with that out of the way, how about I actually review the quest? Okay, so you go to the battery farm which is… under a guy’s house? Like, did this guy know it was there? Did he know about the fact that they butcher Gerts as well? Like, when he asked you for help last time, was he aware of this? That doesn’t really make sense, since he wouldn’t want people to know about it, and definitely wouldn’t want you snooping around, but then, how could he not know? I guess what I’m trying to say is that this quest is stupid here, and doesn’t make sense. Then you go down, and realize that Soylent Green is peo- okay, but seriously, it feels like they tried to cram in a moral message about factory farming in a very ham-fisted way, and it doesn’t really make the quest any better. Also, why do they try to make a point out of how it feeds half of Gavel? Like, I get that battery farms are bad, but if it’s that essential to the feeding of a province, then I’d have a lot more moral issues with shutting it down. Is that the point? Hell if I know. All I know is that there’s another Compulsory Gavel Miniboss (TM) and - okay, one more thing. I get that they need to make him a bad guy so that we’re justified in killing him. But seriously? Dissecting and remaking Gerts? Like, that’s such a random way to be evil. I get that he’s a butcher, so dissecting his victims kind of makes sense or something, but why? Also, the Gerts are just finding out about this, so how has he captured and murdered and reconstructed so many Gerts? Is it because they’re stupid? But they were smart earlier, so they must have noticed this at some point? Whatever, the important thing is that you starve half of Gav- you shut down the evil farm and killed the psycho butcher, and now... it’s over? Everything’s all good? Whatever. I cannot even bring myself to care. I’m glad this will at least get revisited later in the next quest. Haha, yeah.


    78.) Aldorei’s Secret Part II: This time, there’s not even a ton of clever puzzles, it’s all just filler to get to the “shocking” reveal: it was another test. Come on. It isn’t surprising, it just feels like the first quest was pointless. We all knew how this was going to end, and once again we’re given a moral choice where we know that choosing the right thing gives greater rewards, thus robbing us of the reason why such a choice would matter in the first place.


    79.) Fallen Delivery: First, I’d like to make a nice little comment on the first part of this quest: firesucksfiresucksfiresucks. It takes so much of your health if you even step in it for a second, and when everything’s on fire, it’s kind of hard not to. Thank you for coming to my TED talk. Okay, with that out of my system, how’s the actual quest? Honestly, not great. It feels like another filler quest (can we get a “it’s a filler quest” theme song?). Honestly, you run around a bit, find the Compulsory Gavel Miniboss (TM) you knew was coming and then the quest is over. It feels like I’m writing more content about how hard it is to find new ways to say “it’s another filler” than I am saying actual things about actual quests. Man, early Gavel sucked. I’m so glad it’s getting redone.





    80.) From the Bottom: I actually kinda like this quest for some reason; although the running around is kind of boring and repetitive, it’s a fun break from more difficult and serious quests around this level. It is rather short, which is honestly probably for the best as I doubt it could stay interesting for an extended period of time. The grinding for troll hair at the beginning is awful though; the spawn rates and drop rates are abysmal and it took me far too long to get enough.


    80.) General’s Orders: I enjoy this quest, although it does feel a bit too much of a “runaround and do this” type of quest, which tend to get dull rather quickly. However, it manages to stay interesting and every task is unique, so I’ll give it a pass on this. Of course it ends in a Compulsory Gavel Miniboss (TM), because Gavel. Good quest anyway.


    81.) The Thanos Vaults: It’s… kinda boring frankly. I get that it’s supposed to be a huge Gringotts inspired minecart ride, which is neat (followed by a Compulsory Gavel Miniboss (TM) because Gavel), and while it is pretty cool your first time, it does lose a bit of the charm on subsequent runs. Also, it broke for me while I was doing it for this review, rendering the quest pretty much uncompletable, so, uh... minus twenty points for House Contentdor I guess!


    82.) Belly of the Beast: This quest is creative and I like it, but can we address a few things about it first? First off, the fire and the parkour over lava suck. Seriously, it’s easy enough parkour, but it will kill you if you mess up. Seriously. Unless you’re mage or shaman, you mess up and you lose most of your health. The more you fail, the more health you lose. Essentially if you have trouble with it for any reason, it punishes you for continuing to try. The fire is awful too, I tested to see how much health you lose from it. I found that it’s roughly ¼ - ⅓; quite a lot. It feels like this was balanced with pre-Gavel fire/lava damage in mind. Moving on to the actual quest, the premise is fun, if a little unoriginal, and I like the puzzles (thank Salted the first one is now rotated by you), even if their place in the belly of a dragon makes no sense whatsoever. Also, the vanilla reference is cool and all, but a bit out of place. There’s an optional miniboss, which I wouldn’t call out except that it’s another example of a Compulsory Gavel Miniboss (TM), even when it’s optional. Seriously, who told the CT to add a miniboss at the end of every single quest?


    83.) The Envoy Part I: A pretty solid quest. The following portion is a bit stale, but it’s not that bad.The dialogue could use a bit of polishing, but otherwise this is a really solid quest. I don’t really have a lot to say about it. It does a good job setting up Corkus and introducing characters and themes (with some rather clunky dialogue admittedly), but overall is just a solid, fun quest.


    83.) A Marauder's Dues: Okay, this quest. So, the way you get up to the wizard’s tower is a bit clever, where it forces you to use cover and “stealth” but other than that? It drops you down a big pit with a lot of enemies and then you have to climb out. It feels like it was added to fill a gap between real quests when Gavel came out, and hasn’t been touched since. Big fun, such whoop. Oh, and then, to top it all off, your reward is… access to a broken gate. Yup, totally worth it, let’s move on.


    84.) The Canyon Guides: If you’re anything like me, when you heard “escort mission”, you probably said to yourself “but I haven’t even died, why am I in Hell?”. But you never know, maybe this one’s actually fun when you do it. And how is it in practice? Well, it’s not as bad as I expected, but… yeah. For a guy who claims to be terribly nearsighted, Seluc sure can see enemies at any range. I I lost count of the times I had to go back and kill enemies that had respawned because he went back to kill them… over...and over… and over… And honestly, this doesn’t have any real reason to exist. It’s supposed to help you learn your way around Canyon of the Lost, but it doesn’t even do that. It only takes you through a small part, down a path you’ll never use again.


    85.) The Lost: This feels far better at guiding you through Canyon of the Lost than The Canyon Guides, and honestly is rather fun. However, it would work a lot better with a longer render distance, since it can be hard to see where flags are now.


    85.) The Canary Calls: Thank GOD they removed the nausea. Seriously, that made it nearly unplayable when it first came out. I honestly really like this quest, but it does have some serious problems. First and foremost, the minecart appears in the floor (Even my grammarcheck is insisting that this is wrong and that it should be on the floor. It should be grammarcheck. It should be.), making it hard to watch and guide through the tracks. That also makes it harder to push it (which seems to be required now in parts?). I really enjoy the idea of this quest, but that made it an honestly irritating experience to complete.


    86.) Cowfusion: This is a really fun quest. The concept, the mechanics and the story all work pretty well. Some of the dialogue needs updates, but overall it’s pretty good. For a quest that mostly boils down to running around, it doesn’t feel like it, which I heartily approve of. And of course, who would I be if I didn’t point out the Compulsory Gavel Miniboss (TM). Also, you’re having me carry around his removed head? Ew...


    86.) Desperate Metal: Honestly, this quest feels really long and grindy, and like they just went to the school of making Compulsory Gavel Minibosses (TM), but made four of them. None of them are particularly fun, none are really that creative, and honestly none are that memorable.


    87.) Beyond the Grave: This quest starts off looking like it’ll be a very generic “kill a thing and come back” quest, but really, this feels like something straight out of a Diskworld novel. It’s creative, interesting, and has very solid mechanics. The dialogue is fantastic, and while the quest is quick and easy to do, it actually incentivizes you to take longer and to explore the area. Instead of forcing you to waste time, it elongates a very short and simple quest by giving you a reason to take longer. This is how to make a quest take more time, not by adding grinding or traveling across the province bouncing on one leg or whatever. The small details and finds throughout the mansion offer a great deal of exploration potential and makes the quest seem far bigger than it actually is. To top it all off, it ends with a creative and unique boss fight. In fact, I won’t even give this the “Compulsory Gavel Miniboss (TM)” treatment (well, I guess I sorta just did, but really) because it’s actually meant to be fought in a different and creative way, rather than just killing a small enemy with a little extra health. Props to whoever wrote this quest, it’s up there as one of the best.


    87.) Mixed Feelings: I remembered this quest as a buggy, virtually unplayable mess. However, when I played it, it was actually a pleasant, well designed and interesting quest, even if I’m not fond of the “do little tasks for random people” mechanics. I liked the story, the dialogue could use a little improvement but was pretty good. The most annoying thing though is that the story hasn’t been followed up at any point. It gave us a great start, but nothing else, no continuation of the story.


    88.) The Hidden City: This quest is kind of a walking simulator, with not a lot of meat for the amount you run. You aren’t driving the story, you’re watching it unfold for the majority of it. I’d be more okay with this if it had better detective work, or if it had a little more freedom, like if it offered you the choice to betray the humans or to stop the traitor. Also, the twist at the end was nice and pleasant - until you suddenly feel bad about the guy you killed. I like that it gives him motives and a backstory, which makes the quest feel a lot deeper, and frankly I’d love to see that in more quests. Honestly, while the quest itself isn’t too fantastic, I give it some credit for that.


    89.) Enter the Dojo: This quest is cool; it’s a bunch of tests of the skills you’ve learned over the course of the game. Only problem is, there’s already a few of those. A lot of those. And honestly, that really takes away from the quest. It just feels repetitive. But that only applies to the first half. The 3D puzzle is great, and I really enjoy that. The tea section is a bit lackluster and feels kind of filler-y, but it’s surprisingly pleasant, so I’ll give it a pass. Overall a good quest, although I do wish they’d revamp or even do away with the combat section.


    89.) The Envoy Part II: Okay, so until you do this quest, Avos territory is a no-fly zone. So annoying. Speaking of annoying, Maxie. This quest is really long, and it mostly feels like it was made to be. It has running around, fetch quest mechanics, a dungeon with parkour and combat waves, followed by a Compuls- wait, what do you mean this isn’t a Gavel quest?! Then there’s some amazing action sequences… at least they would be if you were doing something, which you’re...not. Then you run through the machines’ headquarters and then there’s another Compulsory Gav- what do you mean it’s not a Gavel quest?! You keep telling me it’s not, but all these awful minibosses suggest otherwise!




    90.) Fantastic Voyage: So this quest starts off with a very interesting twist, a Compulsory Gavel Miniboss (TM) starts off your checklist. Then you go through a sea full of jagged, twisty rocks, and I’ve got got to tell you guys, this part really sucks. Then in the next part it decides to go full fetch quest, so I’m begging you please developers, just give it a rest! Then you run through a sinister, dark, spooky place, and that’s the only part that brought a smile to my face. Honestly this quest seems more filler than treat, which is really a pity because the concept seems kinda neat. I’m not sure where the lore stands with the Silent Expanse, but overall the quests quality is really kind of pants. But despite the bad gameplay and the terrible fetch-questing times, I really love one thing about this quest, all of the rhymes.


    91.) Dwarves and Doguns Part I: First off, I’d like to get this out of the way for all of the quests in this series. The storytelling could not be less subtle if they branded the words “the dwarves are the bad guys here” onto your forehead with a red hot iron. Backwards so you could read it in a mirror. The dialogue is equally cheesy and predictable, and it does tend to make it hard to take the quest seriously. With that out of the way, please understand that’s one of my biggest complaints, and I do really like these quests. That said, my first comment is actually another complaint; the play at the start is very, very cheesy and way too long. The second part, the gathering, is actually much better. After that, it actually gets pretty good, and offers some decent storytelling with the ancient library. Getting 4 tokens is something I usually dread, but in this case I found it to actually be a pleasant and unique challenge as each miniboss (still gonna point out that these are Compulsory Gavel Minibosses (TM) though) was a unique fight with a unique moveset (Actually, on my recent run to make sure my memory of all of these was correct, I instantly killed all of them with my rather overleveled assassin, so that’s going off my memory of last time. Sorry.). The rest of it is pretty good from here on out (also there’s a typo in the description for the dragon skeleton discovery, not sure where to put that so it’s here now.), the biggest complaint I have is that the drill is sometimes buggy. It seems a bit harsh that you just murder the guards who found you, but after all we’ve done...


    92.) Dwarves and Doguns Part II: Unskippable dialogue is not the best way to start a quest, but I’ll forgive it. Once. After that it picks up. The armory bit is both really fun and makes a lot of sense, and gives me that “you’re an unstoppable force of destruction that can lay waste to an entire army” feeling that I should really have at this point (What’s your record for Axelus kills? Mine’s 6.). You also graduate from murder, robbery, kidnapping, extortion, petty theft, trespassing and assault to full on terrorism, so… yeah I dunno why they keep referring to us as heroes in the game. The defense bit is a bit dull but it’s a small flaw in what is overall a really good quest. Axelus is a little okay with you killing hordes of his people, but that’s a topic for another conversation. The slums bit is a bit weird, though. Why does it suddenly shift from “dwarves are mean to Doguns” to “dwarven social injustice” so quickly and randomly. That also doesn’t come back at any point in the questline, but it does in A Hunter’s Calling where we learn that the king is pretty awful. Why hasn’t he hired us yet? We then make our way up a comically oversized toilet and avoid guards because now murdering them is not okay (?) and then Axelus gets all stupid and noble and we’re on to part three.


    93.) Dwarves and Doguns Part III: Fetch quest is fetch quest. This is probably the weak point of the series, after the horrible, dramatic revelation that the Doguns are summoning a demon, you go and grab a bunch of materials in order to get some… quest items? No helmet though, so credit where credit is due. Either way, except for a bit of interesting dialogue, this quest is really, really boring.


    94.) Dwarves and Doguns Part IV: Okay. so, I have a lot to say about this one. It’s good. I love the beginning. You free him from a cage via a fun parkour challenge, while getting some dialogue that gives you a bit more understanding of the story and adds a little more flavor to the world. I love the fact that after you free him, the guards are hostile and you have to leave. It makes sense and drives the story forward. You then go and see the fighting in the dogun village. Some of the scripted fighting actually raises some interesting questions. One dwarf chases a Dogun to the edge of a cliff, the look at each other and then go their separate ways. I seriously want more here. There’s a story there. That’d be a great part of the quest, but sadly it isn’t. It’d be a great NPC event afterwards, but again… Whatever, back on track. You fight your way through a couple of skirmishes, which is okay, but kind of a tiring “kill enemies to progress” rather than an exciting event. Now, I will say I like that there aren't any tokens, which always bug me, but it still is kind of annoying. You then have to fight the boss, which is where I think the quest kind of goes downhill. The boss is creative, but is so incredibly buggy, I frequently spend more time trying to freeze the organs, particularly the final one, than the entire rest of the quest combined. You then are treated to the final cutscene which is meant to be moving, but is ultimately just confusing. Why is the kind willing to call off a millennium-long war because… the people he’s fighting killed his son? Sorry, that makes no sense. Also, the dialogue here is kind of cheesy, much like the rest of the quest, and the fact that we’re supposed to feel bad about Axelus dying is kind of lost because, well, we never had a huge reason to. It would be much more moving if the king died and that ended the war, or if the king listened or something. As it stands, it makes no sense and doesn’t really provide a satisfying conclusion. Also, we’re expected to overlook the fact that the dwarves have been committing genocide against the Doguns for a millenium and the Doguns just tried to summon a demon to… end the world? It doesn’t really feel like a good conclusion.


    95.) One Thousand Meters Under: Well this one does feel a little dated due to the mechanics used, I do really like this one. It’s got a creative story and decent writing. It also explores the nature of the Sky Islands and it gives more character to the void. However some of the parkour sections feel rather lengthy and the quest itself does feel somewhat deliberately stretched out to pad the total length of the quest. Overall, it’s a good and interesting quest, but not one I have a lot to say about really.


    96.) Recipe for Disaster: I have to imagine that whoever made this thought that fetch quests were the coolest thing since sliced bread. It’s a painfully long and complex fetch quest, albeit with a few interesting sections depending on what recipe you pick. However, none of them feel particularly interesting, and while I will admit I like Chef Hamsey, I can’t really claim that the quest he gives you now is much better than the first one he did so many levels ago.


    97.) The Fortune Teller: I feel like this quest is a little too forgettable for what it is. You actually learn a surprising among about the sky islands and their history, and you get to go to a heaven realm and- okay this quest is a bit nonsensical and I think it leans too hard on the “fairy-tale” references to make it interesting. Getting magic beans, climbing the beanstalk and then talking with the dragon is cool, but it’s really weird. The gameplay is fun, but feels a bit uninspired; just a fetch quest and some parkour, and the whole quest is as I said earlier, kind of forgettable.


    98.) Royal Trials: Quest helmet. Entire. Quest. Okay, having got that out of the way, the entire premise of of the helmet is stupid. Queens can’t have short hair? My hair isn’t long? My character isn’t a woman? So many reveals, so little sense. Moving onto the gameplay, there’s a ton of token grinding, which I certainly didn’t get enough of by level 98. Then, there’s the buggy airship flying, which lag renders impossible. You might say that it’s unfair to grade a quest based on what it’s like when it’s laggy, but then I have to ask, have you ever played Wynncraft? It’s less fair to base it on no lag. The heist part is pretty fun, but lasts for far less time than the two previous portions, and certainly doesn’t make up enough of the quest to save it.


    Unfortunately there's an 80,000 character limit, so I'll put the rest of the reviews and my final thoughts on this in the comments.
     
  2. Melkor

    Melkor The dark enemy of the world HERO

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    100.) A Journey Beyond: While I think that most of the quests in the Silent Expanse update were fairly good and even the fetchiest among them is worthy of some praise, I will nonetheless criticize how much this quest really is just a fetch quest. That being said, the dialogue is good, the story is great, and it feels like a fitting introduction to the Silent Expanse. It is however not without its other flaws. The reunion with Aledar feels a bit underwhelming. If I hadn’t just played through the new introduction, there’s norway I’d have remembered who he is. The fetch quest segments, as I mentioned are a bit annoying, mostly just because of how long they are. At least the actual act of fetching is more interesting in this quest than in most. The “new elements” part seems really interesting and important until you realize it’s literally just an excuse to make you go do a fetch quest to drag out the length of the quest some more.The bit with Elphaba hallucinating about uh… losing her liver?! What the HELL?! Okay, that’s disturbing. Now even gonna talk about it. Also, bringing back your dead comrade’s head? What even? This quest is so messed up. The Aledar Cart (AledarKart?) section is funny, but really gets on your nerves after the second time, especially with a low dps build. And finally, I feel like I need to address the elephant in the room; Holy Mother of Salted the unskippable dialogue for days! If this was a star rating, I’d take one off just for that. You know what? No, this is a star rating now. I’m making this a star rating just so that I can take one star off for the unskippable dialogue. 4 stars; pretty good, too much unskippable dialogue.


    100.) The Olmic Rune: Well, as I said most of the quests in the Silent Expanse were good. Here’s the exception. I don’t know why this is a quest. Actually I do; they needed a way to introduce this, and they needed more quests because they were concerned that an update with 4 quests would seem a little small. Well, I actually nearly forgot about this one while doing these reviews, so I can’t really say it’s a huge improvement. This is just a fetch quest with a bit of “kill enemies” at the end. I feel like there are already enough too many of these in the game.


    101.) A Journey Further: This quest had the potential to be more interesting than AJB. However, while AJB suffered from too many random tangents making it too long, this suffers from the opposite. Aside from a bit of neat parkour (that is physically painful when the server’s lagging), there really isn't much substance here. The would-be betrayal and later sacrifice of Aledar would be a lot more meaningful if we had a reason to care about him or a reason to feel betrayed. It’s the same problem I mentioned in the first quest; he doesn’t really have any role in the story up until this point, so there’s no real attachment to him. He just reappears and you have no idea who he is. The rest of the quest feels very linear and very simple, and is only really slowed down by Aledar and the rate at which you can do the quick challenges along the way. Overall this is a good quest and does a marvelous job of introducing you to the far reaches of the Silent Expanse and the sinister building lurking there, but feels like it needs more substance as a quest.


    102.) Point of No Return: I love this quest. It has fun gameplay, a good story and well written dialogue. Definitely one of my favorite quests. It’s certainly one of the only ones with a serious message presented in an obvious way that really is both a good quest and that addresses that message well. However, it does have some serious problems. It’s pretty much impossible when the server is lagging. You fall through the parkour, are unable to progress on the parkour, cannot follow your soul and have trouble with basically all of the mechanics, which is horribly annoying. I ended up having to cheat on the parkour because It literally didn’t work. Also, while I like the ending personally, I think it goes on for a bit too long. It passes the point of symbolic to frustrating and unnecessary.


    103.) A Hunter’s Calling: A fun and interesting premise, but the execution can vary. I like the Ragni one, but it is really simple and raises some lore questions that I won’t mention here. The desert one is also creative but the disappearing parkour can go… anyway, I like that one. It also raises more questions; are some of these scenes real? Did this one happen? We know some of them didn’t. Did some of them? Are they all fake? The Theorick one is also good, and I’m happy to see some more good boss fights being thrown around, even if it does feel a little like filler content. It’s satisfying and adds to the lore. The CoW section is interesting, but it has some issues; the pillar occasionally traps you inside, and it does feel like they started running out of ideas. The Olux portion is creative, and more than a little disturbing, as it is clearly meant to be, which I think fits its material well. The Rodoroc segment is really well designed, as is the Corkus one, but both feel far less exciting, due to the number of segments and the travel required for each.The final boss fight is good, but has some major flaws, particularly the constantly spawning swarm of minions.


    40.) Tower of Ascension: This quest used to be so much more interesting to me, back when this was the most modern feeling area, and all the enemy designs were new and cool and there weren’t so many great quests to compare it to. Now it just feels a bit boring. That being said, I do appreciate the ability to see how you’ve grown in power over time and to slowly progress this quest. It’s just hard to defend it solely because of that. The actual levels feel very much the same over and over, and the bosses are mostly pretty lackluster compared to some of the newer and more mechanically complicated foes we’ve seen in more recent updates, but at least the later ones are rather interesting and difficult to fight, except Alkevö, who’s an awful dps test who does nothing.


    80.) The Qira Hive: Honestly, this quest is quite fun, despite just being Tower of Ascension 2: Gavel Boogaloo. There are a ton of quests with little combat portions designed to “test” you, but this one really feels like a proper challenge. Most of the enemies feel unique and most are fair and fun to fight. While some certainly could do with a rework, for the most part it’s fun. And then at the end you have a challenging and well-designed boss fight. If I could change three things, they’d be to remove Psychomancer, remove flamethrower spell and remove Psychomancer again just to be sure because Psychomancer sucks just that much.


    80.) ???: I had a lot of trouble deciding whether or not this should even be included. It wasn’t really meant to be a quest, but at the same time, it is listed as one, and it is treated as one ingame, so I ultimately decided to write a review for it. I like the concept of this one, and, the first time you do it, it’s quite interesting. However, the experience is heavily shaped by who you go with; a good team can make it quick and easy and overall a pretty pleasant experience, while a bad team can lead to an incredibly aggravating experience and a general hatred of the quest itself. I would love to see a similar challenge in the future, and while it would be nice if it was a singleplayer challenge, I think this only works because of its nature as a team challenge, which lessens my enthusiasm. Overall this is such a mixed bag that it’s really weird to write a review for, so I’m gonna take the easy way out and just say it’s very interesting and can be a really fun quest or the most irritating experience in all of Wynncraft and it’s almost entirely determined by the people you do it with.

    Final notes: Please again take note that all of the opinions I show here are indeed my own real opinions, but many (including nearly all of the negative ones) are extremely exaggerated to make it funnier to read. I highly respect the Wynncraft Content Team and Developers, and as much as I may criticize their work, it's the equivalent of a penguin criticizing the way a sparrow flies. I couldn't possibly do what they do myself, and the most of them are volunteers, who work hard so that ungrateful snobs such as myself can enjoy their hard work. I'd like to thank each and every one of them for making a wonderful server which I've sunk hundreds of hours of my time into and will continue to do so. Without them, I'd never have been able to join these forums, meet the people on them or even write these reviews.

    I'd also like to thank the community for being the sort of people to inspire me to write these out, for all the wonderful conversations I have had and will continue to have over the years, and for all the advice, funny comments and weird, nonsensical dank memes (And of course for the numerous comments I'll doubtless be getting about how I shouldn't be so critical of the developers, because while I love you all, some of you don't always read the fine print.).

    Final Final Notes: I spent quite some time doing these quests, researching the ones I couldn't do, writing these reviews out, editing them, proofreading them, copying them over into this post, editing them again, formatting this post, writing out all these little blurbs, and so on. I don't think of that time as wasted, because ultimately I enjoyed writing these out and I had a lot of fun both doing the "research" and writing out the reviews and that made this all worth it to me. I really do enjoy enjoy this server and its community, and I really do enjoy spending time working on dumb stuff like this because it brings me joy in a way that I think is at least somewhat productive. If you enjoy something productive, no matter how bad you might be at it or how dumb or pointless it might seem, give it a try (within reason obviously). Even if it's just writing out reviews for a video game you like or carving ducks out of wood or learning to play the saxophone, learning something new, expanding your horizons and growing as a person is almost never a bad thing. Maybe you'll only gain the knowledge that you don't actually like it that much. Maybe you'll gain a lot more. You never know without trying. Don't do things because you think that you'll get a reward. Do things because you think that doing it is its own reward. If your goal is to learn, as long as you try you cannot possibly fail.

    While writing these reviews, a lot of things have happened in my life. People have come and gone. I've met new people. I've made new friends. People have moved away. People have died. Things have changed. I have changed. That's life. I'm sorry if I'm getting too philosophical on a thread of humorous reviews about quests in a Minecraft server, but remember that in the end, the only thing about us that really matters to the world is the impact we leave on it and the people in it. Remember to tell the people you care about how much you care about them. Someday, you won't be able to. Make the world a better place. It isn't hard.
     
  3. TrapinchO

    TrapinchO retired observer of the wiki VIP+ Featured Wynncraftian

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    Crafted items best way to get weapons
     
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  4. Melkor

    Melkor The dark enemy of the world HERO

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    Well... it at least addresses the fact that other items exist. Overall it is mostly no longer misleading?
     
  5. TrapinchO

    TrapinchO retired observer of the wiki VIP+ Featured Wynncraftian

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    At least

    Maybe stuff like soul points could be explained, but yes, other than profs it is good. Still missing the pre-1.18 tutorial though
     
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  6. ramenstew

    ramenstew professional idiot HERO

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    Getting huge I hate everything flashbacks. In general though I dislike all quests except for a few, which is why I don’t do them
     
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  7. StormKing3

    StormKing3 Famous Adventurer

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    Fantastic written piece, really appreciated the time spent on this. Very surprised you did it but well done.

    It's the worst quest ever, a stupid cutscene and a clunky poisoning sequence. Never understood how anyone can prefer this over the old quest

    Er, what are these numbers up to and why has some of the text suddenly turned red. Regardless I agree that dwelling walls is very frustrating

    Teehee (Mummy quest gag)


    I really didn't like the plot to this one either, and the boss was the most ridiculous thing I have ever done. So boring and glitchy, honestly one of the most overrated quest lines ever.

    In general women tend to have long hair whilst men cut it short (social reasons, and apparently it suits women better because they usually have smaller skulls, learn something new everyday). It was funny how you had to wear the wig though, like even if you're a girl with long hair anyway, or a guy. And why was "female pirate wig" being sold in a shop anyway, very suspicious; perhaps people have tried to sneak in before? The actual quest is ok but I found the ship section to be incredibly annoying and a bit like flappy bird.

    100% Agree, I hate this new unskippable dialogue nonsense. If it was good dialogue I may be more lenient in my reviewing, but I haven't seen it yet.

    I actually did really enjoy parts of this when the soul worked, the glitches are unbearable however so that makes it one of my least favourites as I was just constantly wanting it to end.

    Again, thanks for writing this and I hope you have a nice day/evening ;)
     
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  8. AcadeeAlkana

    AcadeeAlkana Founder of Operation: A.N.V.I.L. HERO

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    I can feel how much you danced around ???, and I'm pretty curious. Involving teamwork, but it can absolutely suck if you can't be bothered to work together, potentially a sort of team-based Dungeon...Hm.
    ...Intriguing.
    I'm not looking up what it actually is, though. I'm gonna experience the fun - or chaos - with my friends on this one!
     
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  9. TrapinchO

    TrapinchO retired observer of the wiki VIP+ Featured Wynncraftian

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    Trust me, you either will look it up or listen to other people. 99.999% sure.

    And when you do it, I will be glad to help. And propably the only one who will want to do it.
     
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  10. AcadeeAlkana

    AcadeeAlkana Founder of Operation: A.N.V.I.L. HERO

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    I appreciate the support and am kinda scared of the implications!
     
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  11. TrapinchO

    TrapinchO retired observer of the wiki VIP+ Featured Wynncraftian

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    As Melkor said, it depends.
     
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  12. Melkor

    Melkor The dark enemy of the world HERO

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    Without giving away too much, it's a series of puzzles which will almost certainly require the use of a guide. Even with a guide, getting people to properly coordinate is a challenge at best. As such is can be incredibly frustrating if you have a bad team. When I last did it, we had one person who insisted they knew what to do, but actually didn't, so they wouldn't listen to us and kept screwing it up.
     
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  13. Hallowynn

    Hallowynn fresh prince of garbage photoshop editing VIP+

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    don't forget you also get the money she paid him! hells yeah
     
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